Larraine Segil is a renaissance woman. Wikipedia describes her as a South African-born entrepreneur, attorney, advisor, lecturer, author, board member and urban farmer. Here you will find lots of free valuable information on Alliances, Leadership, Cross Border Challenges and more. You will have access to Larraine's books, articles, videos, seminars and conferences on a variety of topics. Register for Larraine's FREE newsletter which will keep you on the cutting edge regarding business insights on alliances and other management topics as well as discussion forums for you to share your challenges with us and some of the thousands of executives who have participated in our alliance, strategy, leadership and cross cultural programs. All of this is available to you - Register Now! If you already registered, just log in below.
In her ‘spare time’ Larraine is also ROCKIN’ GRANDMA! Visit her Rockin' Grandma Music site.

Building Alliances That Stick

By Todd Datz
August 15, 2003, CIO

A partnership guru provides some pointers on developing lasting relationships..
Read the rest of this entry

Dynamic Leader – Adaptive Organisation

Commitment

Emotional commitment is critical for being an effective dynamic leader. For these leaders, commitment is about emotional vesting, perseverance, and passion. The sense of reward they derive from their accomplishments feeds more than their pocketbooks: It feeds their souls.

The word “emotion” is used with restraint in business. It is often equated with weakness and instability. Emotional vesting does not mean losing emotional control. Nor does it mean burdening your coworkers or superiors with emotional problems. Emotional vesting means that the individual has the capacity to have strong and passionate expectations for positive results. It means working with commitment and not clocking in and out on a rigid schedule, but rather as the workload and projects demand. Vesting in the activity means that the desire for success is high — and so are the rewards.

The Environment for Emotional Vesting
Some shortsighted companies may rationalize a high level of emotional vesting by individuals as an excuse not to be concerned about the organizational environment. If employees love their work, the might say, then the working conditions will not matter. That is a very dangerous rationalization, though it may work in the short term.
But, as pressures of growth and market changes case work to be restructured or redefined, the environment and the corporate culture will become a more compelling factor in attracting or retaining people. Lack of attention to a consistent corporate culture is certain to drive away emotionally vested dynamic leaders. What is common in highly political and bureaucratic organizations is that the emotional vesting is psychologically beaten out of people.
Eventually, they protect themselves emotionally from such hurt by not giving their all to make success happen, individually or organizationally.
One sure-fire way that organizations can foster emotional vesting is through fun. Says Valerie Salembier, publisher of Esquire magazine, “The Esquire staff is incredibly committed to what we are doing, but it’s also fun. We’ve created a work environment where there is a lot of laughing going on.
There are so many ups and downs every single day, it is like a big roller coaster ride. As such, one needs to make sure that the people on the team are enjoying what they do so that they can leave at the end of the day happy. All of us believe passionately in this magazine, and because of that we can create the best product and do the right thing for the customer.”

Strategy Insight: ALIGNING THE INTERNET

June 2000
ALIGNING THE INTERNET AND CUSTOMER SERVICE

Online customer support is the wave of the future. As e-commerce continues to surge, the most effective way for a company to improve customer service and enhance customer retention is to web-enable its call center. Industry trends point clearly to heightened customer use of e-mail and Internet requests, with expected response times diminishing from hours to minutes.
Read the rest of this entry

From Integration To Execution: HP At One

By T.C. Doyle & Sonia R. Lelii, VARBusiness
From the May 07, 2003 issue of VARBusiness

When Rich Tear, president and co-founder of CSCI, a privately held VAR based in San Diego, first heard that his then-top vendor partner had agreed to merge with Hewlett-Packard in what would later turn out to be the biggest merger in high-tech history, his first reaction was, “Oh Compaq, not this.”
Read the rest of this entry

Merging Corporate Cultures

Looking beyond the bottom line will ease tensions
By Erin Flynn
Diversity Channel Now Correspondent
Read the rest of this entry

Golden Rules of Alliances

In today’s economy, strategic alliances are a competitive advantage. While attractive rates of internal growth are hard to sustain and fluctuating share prices make acquisition valuations a challenge, savvy companies are increasingly turning to alliances to enable them to penetrate new markets, develop technology, and better manage their supply chain and customers.
Read the rest of this entry

Where Have All The Leaders Gone?

Workforce, December 2002

…And how can HR get them back? Corporate heroes are retiring and disappearing in disgrace. The nature of leadership is changing. And HR is helping to fill the vacuum with a galaxy of new stars.
By Shari Caudron

Read the rest of this entry

December 02, 2002

Many supply relationships would generate far more value if they were managed like alliances. A supply alliance that looks costly in the first stages of development may create great returns in the last stage of development. However if the relationship is seen purely as a supply process, there is little chance of it maturing into a life-stage where the maximum financial benefit is realized for all concerned.
Read the rest of this entry

Strategy Insight: MERGER OF EQUALS

September 2000

THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS A “MERGER OF EQUALS”
Read the rest of this entry

Creating Alliances That Work

May 1997
CEO Refresher

Why do fifty-five percent of alliances fall apart three years after conception? How can the potential for alliance success be increased?
Read the rest of this entry

 Page 9 of 10  « First  ... « 6  7  8  9  10 »